kitmillsdraws:

"It really is rather like me, is it not?"
—The Adventure of the Empty House.
You can buy this as a print.

kitmillsdraws:

"It really is rather like me, is it not?"

—The Adventure of the Empty House.

You can buy this as a print.

(via zincesaucier)

bakerstreetbabes:

Just because you don’t understand something, it doesn’t mean it isn’t awesome, okay?

xoxoxo

(Source: joan-watsons)

pop-culture-savvy-fallen-angel:

thetrekkiehasthephonebox:

gridbugs:

gwnsstacys:

Nebula and Gamora

This looks like they’re launching into a Broadway-style antagonistic musical number a la Wicked.

I’m glad I’m not the only one who thought that

SO THOUGH i CAN’T IMAGINE HOOOOOOOOW

pop-culture-savvy-fallen-angel:

thetrekkiehasthephonebox:

gridbugs:

gwnsstacys:

Nebula and Gamora

This looks like they’re launching into a Broadway-style antagonistic musical number a la Wicked.

I’m glad I’m not the only one who thought that

SO THOUGH i CAN’T IMAGINE HOOOOOOOOW

(Source: gammorahs, via maris-rose)

Benedict Cumberbatch for British GQ magazine (x)

(Source: benedictdaily, via sherlockshenanigans)

cumberbuddy:

Some truly lovely things that Matthew Goode has had to say about Benedict in the GQ mag previously posted. The last two paragraphs make it..

(via cumberbatchweb)

larygo:

(x)

larygo:

(x)

(via batik96)


I think @tatianamaslany likes her new @EW pillow. She always sleeps on her face. #SDCC #EntertainmentWeekly (x)

I think @tatianamaslany likes her new @EW pillow. She always sleeps on her face. #SDCC #EntertainmentWeekly (x)

(Source: evilbrochu, via dishonouronyourtarg)


x

x

(Source: cumberswag, via vat1cancame0s)

piningjohn:

incurablylazydevil:

John Watson + jealousy (2/2)

CAN YOU FUCKING BELIEVE JOHN 

(via hirondelphique)

Natasha Romanoff is an Avenger, an agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. and an ex-KGB assassin, but on her own time, she uses her unique skill set to atone for her past. She is Black Widow.

(Source: paltrowpotts, via dishonouronyourtarg)

art-of-swords:

Cinquedea Shortsword

  • Dated: early 16th century
  • Culture: Italian
  • Measurements: blade length 57cm (22 1/2 inches)

The sword has a broad flat tapering blade formed with a pair of near full-length shallow fullers and a slender central flat on each face and decorated on each side with pairs of engraved roundels including the figure of Marcus Curtius leaping into the abyss.

The forte us engraved on the respective faces with a panel of scrolling foliage above the Judgement of Paris and a classical triumph. The panels are divided by the central slender flat engraved with the inscription ‘Virtus Omnia Vincit’ (Virtue Conquers All) on one side and ‘In Domino Confido’ (In God I trust) on the other. The forte decoration has traces of original gilding.

The iron hilt comprising arched quillons is engraved with classical profile roundels flanked together by a Pegasus to either side and scrolling renaissance foliage. The shaped tang is enclosed by a pair of gilt panels chased with the inscription ‘Nunquam Potest Non’ and ‘Esse Virtuti Locus’ (there must ever be a place for virtue).

The grip has on each side a shaped ivory panel over a horn fillet (both cracked and chipped, the ivory and horn perhaps later), the former being engraved with a laurel swag, pierced with four holes of differing size and each fitted with a brass collar, and three retaining their tracery rondels on each side (one missing).

The inscription around the tang is a quotation from Lucius Annaeus Seneca’s Medea. The form of the blade is similar to a cinquedea preserved in the Musée de l’ Armée, Paris (inv. no. MA J 34). For related examples see L. G. Boccia & E. T. Coelho 1975, nos. 190-238 and C. Blair 1966.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Thomas del Mar

mid0nz:

Sherlock: The Empty Hearse Behind the Scenes:
What are We Looking At?

That’s Phoebe Arnstein, the clapper loader; Steve Lawes, the director of photography; and Jeremy Lovering, the director on the right. (x)

Steve’s holding a rig with 2 Canon 5D DSLR cameras attached. They filmed the tube scene simultaneously with both cameras rolling and merged the two images.

What we did use on The Empty Hearse was two cameras together in a kind of stereo converged configuration. So a lot of the stuff where he’s in his mind palace or on the tube and you see him come in and go out go back and come in, that’s a new thing we discovered on series three. The original idea of Sherlock’s point of view was always based on taking stills. I came up with the idea and Paul [McGuigan] wanted— on series one we agonized about how we would show the world differently from Sherlock’s perspective. One of the things we talked about was basically shooting the scene twice in two different styles which is a great idea but it’s kind of unfeasible in terms of production because you need twice as much time and also it’s really weird to think about how you’d do it compared to how you just shot it. We were brainstorming about ideas and I had this idea of — I’d done it in a series once before where we’d taken a series of stills from a big wide shot into somebody’s eye and then morphed them together. Basically the guy was injecting drugs and it was the idea of right at that point when he was getting high that it’s going into his pupil dilating. I was talking about this to Paul and even though he’s a very visual director he can’t understand anything unless he sees it. I remember going home with my iPhone and taking a series of stills in my front room up to my wife’s face and then compiling the little video and putting it on my phone and then taking it to work the next day which is the Sherlock vision that you know and love now and see. I’m showing him this shot and him going “yes, I really like that.” It was that idea that you start here and you go into something that you do it as a series of stills. We did that on series one which they kind of continued on series two for series three… I think it comes out of the fact that with another director they don’t necessarily understand what you’ve done before, I mean you talk to them about the idea of stills a) I’m not completely sure if they understand it but b) they want to do something different you know because it’s season three and Jeremy [Lovering] is first director and he wants to do something different. So we came up with the idea of the two 5Ds [Canon cameras] together. It was the idea that if you set a point of convergence and you have something moving at some point you’ll get these two images and they’ll come together and they’ll go apart again. It was mainly a continuation of his mind palace— just trying to visually create something different to express what goes on in Sherlock’s head. -Steve Lawes (x)

(via chasingriversong)

(Source: benbenny, via dixiebell)